Pamela Paul
PP
PP

Author and journalist

Pamela Paul

Upcoming Single Ticket Events

Bio

I am the author of six books and the editor of The New York Times Book Review. I oversee all books coverage at The New York Times and host the weekly Book Review podcast. My seventh book and first picture book​,​ "Rectangle Time​,​" will be published in February. My next book for adults​,​ "100 Things We've Lost to the Internet​,​" will be out in Fall 2021.

Synopsis/Praise

Cats magically appear for cuddling when it’s readaloud time, and Paul (How to Raise a Reader, for adults) imagines the ritual from a feline’s point of view. “Oh, good, it’s time! They’re bringing out the rectangle,” says a self-interested calico as her owners, a light brown–skinned man and his young son, pull a book off the shelf. But what happens when the maturing reader learns to handle “rectangles” on his own? As the boy grows, the cat’s brash naivete elicits giggles. “Look at the poor little guy,” the cat says of the lone child, silently reading a chapter book: “He’s just… staring at the rectangle.” Solitary rectangle-handling, the calico discovers, means less cuddling. As the cat pesters the boy, the child’s inattention and a swat away creates doubt for the feline (“Eh, no big deal. It wasn’t on purpose. I get it”) before a final, fuzzy rapprochement ends in an accommodation for all. Placid, doll-like characters created by Cameron (Monet’s Cat) underscore the story’s comforting moments rather than adding antic expressions or frenetic action. With comedy that goes right over the head of the feline narrator, Paul’s clever, self-assured text offers owners (and their cats) some promising rectangle time of their own. —Publishers Weekly Our narrator, a portly male calico cat, is delighted to explain his place in the important evening ritual of Rectangle Time—when the cat’s boy listens to his father read him a story from a cat-puzzling rectangle. The cat assists, of course, offering his chin for both humans to rub (and rubbing the rectangle so it feels important, too). As the story progresses, Rectangle Time begins to change. First, the boy and father read back and forth, so the cat lends its purrs to help. Then, the boy stares at the rectangle silently, so the cat stays close to keep him comfortable. As the boy becomes a more independent reader (and the rectangles grow smaller and smaller), the cat struggles to find his place in this new Rectangle Time. Line and watercolor in calm, pastel hues reinforce the joke and make our feline hero cuddly and personable. Clearly written by friends of felines, the text creates a narrator who is persistent, clever, and frequently annoy—er, incredibly helpful. Just beneath kitty’s enjoyable antics is a hopeful moral about growing up, teaching the listener that while they may change, their friendships can change along with them. Paul is particularly adept at creating a narrative whose structure echoes its story, as this readaloud is sure to become a read-along as the listener’s own literacy and vocabulary skills increase. It’s a perfect fit for cat fanciers enjoying a Rectangle Time of their own. –Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books A sweet story about falling in love with reading. —Kirkus Any reader who has ever lived with a cat will recognize the antics of this book’s feline narrator. A chunky and supremely confident calico loves Rectangle Time (or as onlookers will note, lap-time reading), when he snuggles in a chair with a dad, his toddler boy, and their rectangle. Clearly the cat has no idea what reading is, and he becomes more puzzled as the boy grows and the father is no longer doing all the talking at Rectangle Time. Soon enough, the boy holds his rectangle by himself and nobody is talking at all. How lonely and quiet! The cat tries to be helpful in any way he can, adding background music with purrs, leaning in close for company, patting at the pages, and “enhancing” an open book by sitting directly on it. His services are not appreciated until the cat learns to drape himself around the boy’s shoulders. The words “reading” and “books” are never used in this kitty monologue, yet the story subtly celebrates the pleasures of being read to and of growing toward reading independence. The text works best when it is spare and shares the storytelling with the illustrations. A delicate line and soft washes portray a cozy home, a warm father-son relationship, and an adorably persistent, clueless cat. VERDICT A good option to hand educators needing to teach inference and for lovers of silly cats. —School Library Journal New York Times Book Review editor Paul enters the picture-book arena on little cat feet, humorously adopting the egocentric perspective of a family’s feline. The story begins with a dad selecting a book (a “rectangle” in kitty speak) to read to his little boy. The calico narrates as the pair each holds one edge of the book in order to keep a hand free for petting her. She demonstrates other ways that she is involved in this pastime, like scratching her head on the book’s corner “to make the rectangle feel useful” and sitting on an open book to enhance it. As the story progresses, readers watch the boy grow up and change his reading habits, but the tenacious kitty always finds a way to stay close to her human and his reading material. Cameron’s springtime palette complements the story’s sunny tone and the cat’s many expressions are truly delightful.

PP
Upcoming Events from Pamela Paul

Verified reviews (0)

    Upcoming Single Ticket Events